Online Class & Course Descriptions

At Allied, we provide you with choices As a private online high school student, you can pick courses to satisfy your specific needs. There are many different classes that you can choose to reach your academic goals, confident that you will get a well-rounded education and the skills to succeed in each subject area.

All of these online classes include relevant study materials and high-quality instruction. They are college-prep and rigorously aligned with national and state standards.

Requirements for successfully completing both our General Diploma and College Preparatory tracks are clear and straightforward.

English

English 09A (eng9a)
English 9A features reading, writing, listening, and speaking exercises where you read and analyze fiction, poetry, nonfiction, and informational texts. You will produce and evaluate writing exercises, including autobiographical narratives, short stories, comparison-contrast essays, persuasive essays, descriptive essays, and analyses of nonfiction.

Credits: 0.5

English 09B (eng9b)
English 9B features reading, writing, listening, and speaking exercises where you read and analyze fiction, poetry, drama, and informational texts. You will produce and evaluate writing exercises, including poetry, plays, comparison-contrast essays, persuasive essays, cause/effect essays, and analyses of nonfiction. You will also deliver and evaluate oral presentations. Prerequisites: You must successfully pass English 9A.

Credits: 0.5

English 10A (eng10a)
English 10A features reading, writing, listening, and speaking exercises where you read and analyze fiction, poetry, drama, and informational texts. You will produce and evaluate writing exercises, including poetry, plays, comparison-contrast essays, persuasive essays, cause/effect essays, and analyses of nonfiction. You will also deliver and evaluate oral presentations. Prerequisites: You must successfully pass English 9B.

Credits: 0.5

English 10B (eng10b)
English 10B features reading, writing, listening, and speaking exercises where you read and analyze fiction, poetry, drama, and informational texts. You will produce and evaluate writing exercises, including poetry, plays, comparison-contrast essays, persuasive essays, cause/effect essays, and analyses of nonfiction. You will also deliver and evaluate oral presentations. Prerequisites: You must successfully pass English 10A.

Credits: 0.5

English 11A (eng11a)
English 11A features reading, writing, listening, and speaking exercises where you read and analyze fiction, poetry, nonfiction, and informational texts. You will read American literature from the early 17th century to the present. You will produce and evaluate writing exercises, including editorials, short stories, and reflective essays. You will also deliver and evaluate presentations, including speeches and oral reflections. Prerequisites: You must successfully pass English 10B.

Credits: 0.5

English 11B (eng11b)
English 11B features reading, writing, listening, and speaking exercises where you read and analyze fiction, poetry, nonfiction, and informational texts. You will produce and evaluate writing exercises, including literary and nonfiction analyses. You will also deliver and evaluate presentations, including recitations of literature. Prerequisites: You must successfully pass English 11A.

Credits: 0.5

English 12A (eng12a)
English 12A features reading, writing, listening, and speaking exercises where you read and analyze fiction, poetry, nonfiction, and informational texts. You will produce and evaluate writing exercises, including a writing descriptive and literary essay. You will also deliver and evaluate a literary response. Areas of study include: The Anglo Saxons (449 – 1066); The Middle Ages (1066 – 1485); The Renaissance (1485 – 1660); and The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century (1660 – 1800). Prerequisites: You must successfully pass English 11B.

Credits: 0.5

English 12B (eng12b)
features reading, writing, listening, and speaking exercises where you read and analyze fiction, poetry, nonfiction, and informational texts. You will produce and evaluate writing exercises, including a reflective essay. Areas of study include: British and World Literature including The Romantic Period (1798 – 1832); The Victorian Period (1832 – 1901); and The Modern World (1900 – Present). Prerequisites: You must successfully pass English 12A.

Credits: 0.5


Fine Arts

Art Appreciation A (arta)
Art Appreciation A is an enjoyable online class that guides you through a standards-aligned art textbook. Areas of study include: Creating and Understanding Art; Art of Early Civilizations; and Art of Rising Civilizations. It consists of three units, each containing several lessons. Each week, you will read an online lesson and complete a homework assignment and quiz. The material in your lessons, homework assignments, and quizzes will prepare you for the unit and final exams.

Credits: 0.5

Art Appreciation B (artb)
Art Appreciation B covers: Art of Asia, the Americas, and Africa; Art in Quest of Salvation; Art of an Emerging Modern Europe; and Art of the Modern Era. It consists of four units, each containing several lessons. Each week, you will read an online lesson and complete a homework assignment and quiz. The material in your lessons, homework assignments, and quizzes will prepare you for the unit and final exams. Prerequisites: You must successfully pass Art Appreciation A.

Credits: 0.5

Music Appreciation A (musa)
In Music Appreciation A, you will study the nature of music, including: listening techniques, rhythm, melody and harmony, dynamics, timbre, orchestral instruments and more. You will also study music from around the world, including folk and ethnic music from Europe, the Americas, Africa, the Middle East, and the music of Asia. Additionally, you will analyze western music before 1750, including styles and periods, early western music, the Renaissance and Baroque periods.

Credits: 0.5

Music Appreciation B (musb)
In Music Appreciation B, you will study the Classical period, including the sonata form, the concerto, opera, chamber music, and the works of Beethoven. You will also study the Romantic period, including piano music, program music, ballet, nationalism, impressionism and post-romanticism. You will study 20th century music, including expressionism, neoclassicism, tone rows, and serialism. Prerequisites: You must successfully pass Music Appreciation A.

Credits: 0.5


Foreign Language

Spanish 1A (span1a)
Bienvenidos! Welcome! Spanish 1A teaches you about the 21 Spanish-speaking countries and cultures from around the world! You will learn how to greet others; introduce yourself; give background information; describe people; tell time; talk about basic actions in the present tense; describe food and the dining experience; say what you and others own; and discuss likes.

Credits: 0.5

Spanish 1B (span1b)
In Spanish 1B, you learn how to discuss future plans, the house and family, sports and athletes, and your schedule. It teaches you to explain what you do in different seasons, and how people give and do things for others. You will be able to describe events currently taking place, and begin to discuss past actions. Also, you will learn how to compare people, places and things. Prerequisites: You must successfully pass Spanish 1A.

Credits: 0.5

Spanish 2A (span2a)
Spanish 2A begins with a review of fundamental skills from Spanish 1A & 1B. New material covers: ordering food; describing and shopping for clothes; giving directions and commands; discussing everyday routines; and building on your ability to narrate in the past. You will increase your conversational skill with the present progressive and preterite (past) tenses. Prerequisites: You must successfully pass Spanish 1A & 1B.

Credits: 0.5

Spanish 2B (span2b)
In Spanish 2B, you learn how to describe lengths of time; discuss the family and household; state opinions, wishes and desires; discuss television shows and radio; write people’s actions; plan vacations; express certainty and probability; describe travel; discuss the future; provide information about careers; and discuss everyday activities. New grammar includes the imperfect (ongoing past) and future tenses. Prerequisites: You must successfully pass Spanish 2A.

Credits: 0.5


Health

Health/Life Skills A (health)
Health/Life Skills A teaches you about healthy living. Topics include: building a healthy foundation; physical activity and nutrition; mental and emotional health; and personal care and body systems. The course consists of four units, divided into 18 lessons. You will be required to read an online lesson along with excerpts from the textbook, and complete weekly homework assignments and quizzes. At the end of each unit, you will take a unit exam, with the last containing your final exam.

Credits: 0.5

Health/Life Skills B (healthb)
Health/Life Skills B is a continuation of Life/Health Skills A, but focuses more on personal development. Topics of interest include: promoting safe and healthy relationships; growth and development; tobacco, alcohol, and other drugs; diseases and disorders; injury prevention; and environmental health. The course consists of five units, divided into 18 lessons. Prerequisites: You must successfully pass Health/Life Skills A.

Credits: 0.5


Mathematics

Pre-Algebra A (prealga)
Pre-Algebra A provides the foundation for further studies in Algebra in order to solve problems and to evaluate expressions through real-world applications. The content covered includes the following: learning the tools of Algebra; addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of integers; solving equations; solving two-step equations; factors and fractions; rational numbers; and ratio, proportion, and percent. Pre-Algebra A includes 2 Units, ranging from 6 – 8 Lessons per Unit. Prerequisites: basic mathematics.

Credits: 0.5

Pre-Algebra B (prealgb)
Pre-Algebra B has been developed to teach the basic tools of algebra, including variables, integers, and equations. It lays the foundation for further studies in Algebra, Geometry, and Statistics through real-world applications. The content covered includes the following: equations and inequalities; functions and graphing; real numbers and right triangles; two-dimensional figures; three-dimensional figures; more statistics and probability, and polynomials and nonlinear functions. Pre-Algebra B includes 3 Units, ranging from 6 – 8 Lessons per Unit. Prerequisites: Pre-Algebra A.

Credits: 0.5

Algebra 1A (alg1a)
Algebra 1A teaches algebraic concepts that can be applied to real-world and mathematical situations. The content includes: the structures and properties of real numbers; data analysis concepts and methods; exponents, absolute value, square roots, radicals, and scientific notation; various solution strategies; coordinate geometry and graphing; various ways of analyzing and expressing patterns, relations and functions; and the use of variables and algebraic expressions.

Credits: 0.5

Algebra 1B (alg1b)
Algebra 1B includes: operations with polynomials, with addition, subtraction, and multiplication; factoring and solving polynomial equations; graphing and solving quadratic and exponential functions; radical expressions and equations; triangles and other trigonometric ratios; and statistics and probability. Prerequisites: You must successfully pass Algebra 1A.

Credits: 0.5

Algebra 2A (alg2a)
Algebra 2A broadens the concepts learned in Algebra 1. The content includes: an understanding of the construction of numbers, operations, and properties; polynomials; solving and graphing quadratic equations; the use of matrices and determinants to solve nonlinear systems; solving equations with three variables; using functional notation and the arithmetic of functions to solve equations. Prerequisites: You must successfully pass Algebra 1A & 1B and Geometry.

Credits: 0.5

Algebra 2B (alg2b)
Algebra 2B includes: solving rational and radical equations, inequalities, absolute value, and conic sections; solving and graphing trigonometric functions and identities; solving exponentials and logarithmic equations; the use of matrices and determinants to solve nonlinear systems, sequences, and series; using functional notation and the arithmetic of functions to solve systems. Prerequisites: You must successfully pass Algebra 2A.

Credits: 0.5

Geometry A (geoma)
Geometry A teaches geometric relationships and deductive strategies that can be applied to real-world and mathematical situations. The content includes: learning the fundamental properties and geometric constructions; using postulates and theorems to construct proofs; learning coordinate geometry and transformations; solving formulas; and exploring parallelism, perpendicularity, congruence, and similarity. Prerequisites: You must successfully pass Algebra 1.

Credits: 0.5

Geometry B (geomb)
Geometry B Includes: using ratios and proportions to explore the same, but different sized shapes; developing properties of polygons, including quadrilaterals and triangles; looking at different types of transformations and tessellations; developing parts and relationships in circles; applying the areas and volumes of geometric shapes to everyday objects and density; and writing geometric proofs. Prerequisites: You must successfully pass Geometry A.

Credits: 0.5

Pre-Calculus A (precala)
Pre-Calculus A applies concepts from Algebra and Geometry to real-world situations. The content includes: solving systems of linear equations, inequalities, parametric equations, and operations with matrices and inverse trigonometric functions. It covers definitions, graphs, identities, properties, and applications of transcendental functions and their graphs, as well as right and oblique triangles and vector notation. Prerequisites: You must successfully pass Algebra 2.

Credits: 0.5

Pre-Calculus B (precalb)
Pre-Calculus B includes: solving systems of linear equations, inequalities, parametric equations, and operations with matrices; properties and applications of transcendental functions and their graphs; right and oblique triangle trigonometry, conic sections, and vector notation; exponential and logarithmic functions with real-world applications; polar coordinates and complex numbers, sequences and series. Prerequisites: You must successfully pass Pre-Calculus A.

Credits: 0.5

Science

Biology A (bioa)
In Biology A, you will learn about the living world by focusing on four major themes in Biology: Cell Biology, Genetics, Evolution, and Ecology. You will explore these concepts through textbook readings, online assignments, and hands-on laboratory activities. After completing this class, you will meet the science prerequisite for Biology B.

Credits: 0.5

Biology B (biob)
In Biology B, you will continue your exploration of the living world by examining five themes in Biology: Diversity, Plants, Invertebrates, Vertebrates, and Human Biology. You will explore these concepts through textbook readings, online assignments, and hands-on laboratory activities. After completing this class, you will meet the science prerequisite for Chemistry A. Prerequisites: You must successfully pass Biology A.

Credits: 0.5

Chemistry A (chema)
Chemistry A will introduce you to the study of the physical world by examining: Matter and Energy, Atoms and Moles, The Periodic Table, Ions and Ionic Compounds, Covalent Compounds, Chemical Equations and Reactions, Stoichiometry, and the Causes of Change. You will explore these concepts through textbook readings, online assignments, and hands-on laboratory activities. Prerequisites: You must successfully pass Biology and Algebra 1.

Credits: 0.5

Chemistry B (chemb)
Chemistry B will continue your exploration of the physical world by examining: States of Matter and Intermolecular Forces, Gases, Solutions, Chemical Equilibrium, Acids and Bases, Reaction Rates, Oxidation, Reduction, and Electrochemistry, Nuclear Chemistry, Carbon and Organic Compounds, and Biological Chemistry. You will explore these concepts through textbook readings, online assignments, and hands-on laboratory activities. Prerequisites: You must successfully pass Chemistry A and Algebra 1.

Credits: 0.5

Earth Science A (eartha)
Earth Science A will introduce you to the study of the Earth. You will learn about the composition of the Earth; the history of the Earth; and how the Earth is constantly changing. You will receive hands-on experience through practical exercises and assignments.

Credits: 0.5

Earth Science B (earthb)
Earth Science B will continue your exploration of the Earth by focusing on Oceans, Atmosphere, and Space. You will learn about the ocean basins, ocean water, and movement of the ocean; water in the atmosphere, weather, and climate; and the planets and minor bodies of the solar system. You will receive hands-on experience through practical exercises and assignments. Prerequisites: You must successfully pass Earth Science A.

Credits: 0.5

Environmental Science A (environa)
Environmental Science A will challenge you to think about your role in the environment. Are you a responsible steward of the Earth? You will explore how your beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors affect the environment, as well as learn how scientists are working to solve the numerous environmental problems we face today. The course consists of 10 lessons that cover the following themes: Introduction to Environmental Science, Ecology, and Populations. You will explore these concepts through textbook readings and online assignments and activities each week. Prerequisites: none.

Credits: 0.5

Environmental Science B (environb)
Environmental Science B will challenge you to think about your role in the environment. Are you a responsible steward of the Earth? You will explore how your beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors affect the environment, as well as learn how scientists are working to solve the numerous environmental problems we face today. The course consists of 11 lessons that cover the following themes: Water, Air, and Land; Mineral and Energy Resources; and Our Health and Our Future. You will explore these concepts through textbook readings and online assignments and activities each week. Prerequisites: Environmental Science A or equivalent.

Credits: 0.5

Life Science A (lifea)

Life Science is the study of living things, and in this course, you will explore life – starting with the simple and microscopic, working your way up to the most complex life forms. Life Science A will cover the study of living things, cells, heredity, evolution, and classification, and simple organisms, fungi, and protists. Each unit consists if lessons and a unit exam. There is a final exam at the end of the course.            

Credits: 0.5

Life Science B (lifeb)

Life Science is the study of living things, and in this course, you will continue the exploration of life by examining the animal kingdom. You will see how life on Earth interacts with other life and the environment. The course will conclude with an examination of the human body and human health. Life Science B consists of four units based on animals, ecology, human body systems, and human health. Each unit consists of lessons and a unit exam (except for unit 4), followed by a final exam at the end of the course.                       


Credits: 0.5

 

Marine Biology (marbio)
75% of the Earth is covered with ocean! In Marine Biology, you will explore the amazing watery world and the life that calls the ocean home. The course is divided into four major themes: Principles of Marine Science, Life in the Marine Environment, Structure and Function of Marine Ecosystems, and Humans and the Sea. Prerequisites: Biology A and B.

Credits: 0.5

Oceanography (ocean)
Oceanography is the science of the ocean. In this course, you will get to know the ocean world---its origins, structure, chemistry, circulation, and movement (waves and tides). You will explore the various communities that exist in this massive ecosystem, as well as how humans affect the sea and how the sea affects humans. Prerequisites: Biology A and B, Chemistry A and B.

Credits: 0.5

Physics A (physa)
Physics A will introduce you to the concepts of Motion in One Dimension, Two-Dimensional Motion and Vectors, Forces and the Laws of Motion, Work and Energy, Momentum and Collisions, Circular Motion and Gravitation, Fluid Mechanics, Heat, and Thermodynamics. You will explore these concepts through textbook readings, online assignments, and hands-on laboratory activities. Prerequisites: You must successfully pass Chemistry and Geometry.

Credits: 0.5

Physics B (physb)
Physics B will continue your exploration of the world through Vibrations and Waves, Sound, Light and Reflection, Refraction, Interference and Diffraction, Electric Forces and Fields, Electrical Energy and Current, Circuits, Magnetism, Electromagnetic Induction, Atomic Physics, and Subatomic Physics. You will explore these concepts through textbook readings, online assignments, and hands-on laboratory activities. Prerequisites: You must successfully pass Physics A, Geometry.

Credits: 0.5


Social Science

Economics (econ)
Economics looks at how people strive to live abundant lives and provide for their needs in the face of limited resources. You will study many aspects of economics in this one-semester class, including different economic systems, money, markets, supply, demand, competition, and governmental policies.

Credits: 0.5

Geography A (geoga)
Geography A covers the basic elements in the study of geography. It begins with our position in the universe and ending with population concentrations.  Then we travel to North America, Central and South America, Europe, and then Russia, stopping in each region to consider natural environments, history, culture, and the special challenges faced today by those particular populations.  We also take a moment to reflect on what may lie ahead. 

Credits: 0.5

Geography B (geogb)
In the second semester, the journey continues to Southwest Asia, Africa, South Asia, East and Southeast Asia and the South Pacific.  We examine their natural environments, unique history and culture, and challenges lived today.  Where once again, we consider all the elements which have shaped their past and their present.  Then, we take some calculated guesses as to the shape of their future.  Prerequisites: You must successfully pass Geography A.

Credits: 0.5

United States Government (usgov)
United States Government provides a close look at the basic structure of our democratic society and how we are led. It is a glimpse at the individuals and groups holding political power and what it takes to make important changes. You will learn how the government relates to your everyday world. You will also become aware that your country’s success as a democracy and leading voice for freedom in the world depends on your understanding of and participation in government.

Credits: 0.5

United States History A (ushista)
United States History A provides an in-depth look at the people who shaped the roots and character of this world power. This includes how they lived on a daily basis, struggled to survive, and ultimately thrived. It is about their ideas, dreams and plans put forth in that struggle. You will look at the earliest Americans, early explorations and colonies, the creation of a nation, different political eras, and the Civil War.

Credits: 0.5

United States History B (ushistb)
United States History B studies the modern history of the United States. You will learn about the impact of the Civil War on the past and present. You will witness the settling of the west and the development of industry. You will view two world wars and their impact on the American people. Additionally, you will gain familiarity with political regimes and social movements. Prerequisites: You must successfully pass United States History A.

Credits: 0.5

World History A (wha)
World History A studies people and their behaviors as individuals and groups. In the first semester, you will begin by looking at the earliest humans in Africa, then follow man’s development in Asia, Egypt, India, China, Ancient Greece, Rome, Europe and the Americas up to the 1800s. With this information, you will better understand the people and events that affect your life.

Credits: 0.5

World History B (whb)
World History B starts with the 1500s and teaches you about revolutions in man’s thinking and innovations. You will study the social and political revolutions in France and industrial revolutions around the world. Learn about the spread of democracy and economic development in all parts of the world.  Witness the impact of world wars. Study our current challenges and speculate on the future. Prerequisites: You must successfully pass World History A.

Credits: 0.5


Electives

HTML Course (HTML)

This HTML course will prepare students with the entry-level knowledge necessary for creating a Web site. Areas of focus include manipulating Web page text, creating links to internal and external Web pages, using Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) to create a uniform and consistent design, and more. The HTML course consists of three units, each unit containing five lessons for a total of fifteen lessons. The materials in each lesson, homework assignment and quizzes will prepare students for the unit and final exams.

Credits: 0.5

Microsoft® Office Applications (wandword & xxlppt))
Microsoft® Office Applications provide you with comprehensive training in Microsoft® Windows, Word, Excel and PowerPoint. You will learn how to effectively use each program, as well as apply it in a professional setting. This includes practical, real-world skills that are useful in the workplace. The classes provide hands-on lessons and assignments. (The first semester covers Windows & Word, and the second semester covers Excel & PowerPoint. Each class is worth 0.5 credits.)

Credits: 1

MTAPPP A & B (mtapppa & mtapppb)
MTAPPP A & B provides you with a sound basis of medical-related concepts. You will learn the terminology you need to succeed in the health care industry. The classes cover medical terminology, anatomy, physiology, pathology, and pharmacology. You’ll receive a solid foundation, which can prepare you for a future career as a medical coder, biller or transcriptionist. (These are two separate classes that take place over two semesters. Each class is worth 0.5 credits)

Credits: 1  

Psychology A (psycha)
Psychology A introduces you to the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. You will learn about approaches to psychology, the life span, and the workings of mind and body. You will be able to use this information to gain insight into your life and the lives of those around you. The course consists of three units, divided into 18 lessons. Each week, you will be required to read an online lesson along with excerpts from the textbook, and complete a homework assignment and quiz.

Credits: 0.5

Psychology B (psychb)
Psychology B teaches you about personality, individuality, adjustment and breakdown, and social psychology. You will be able to use this information to gain insight into your life and the lives of those around you. The course consists of four units, divided into 18 lessons. Each week, you will be required to read an online lesson along with excerpts from the textbook, and complete a homework assignment and quiz. Prerequisites: You must successfully pass Psychology A.

Credits: 0.5

Sociology A (soca)
Sociology A examines how individuals, groups, and institutions interact to make up human societies. You will learn about sociological perspectives, culture, social structures, and social inequality. You will study people and the roles they play in society, both as individuals and groups. The course consists of three units, divided into 18 lessons. Each week, you will be required to read an online lesson along with excerpts from the textbook, and complete a homework assignment and quiz.

Credits: 0.5

Sociology B (socb)
Sociology B teaches you about social institutions and social change. Topics of interest include: the family, education, political and economic institutions, religion, and sport. The course consists of four units, divided into 15 lessons. Each week, you will be required to read an online lesson along with excerpts from the textbook, and complete a homework assignment and quiz. Prerequisites: You must successfully pass Sociology A.

Credits: 0.5